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Lifelong Learning - Zoom at Noon - Hidden in Plain Sight: Early African American Cinema

April 26, 2023 at 12:00 to 1:00 p.m. EST
Hosted Virtually by IUAA

Zoom at Noon – Hidden in Plain Sight: Early African American Cinema

Wednesday, April 26

Noon–1 p.m. ET

Virtual class offered via Zoom*

$10 per person 

Although Black Americans began producing films in the earliest days of moving pictures, nearly all such films from the silent period (1896–1927) are lost. For decades, film historians have believed the earliest surviving, Black-produced films date to the 1920s. 

Join IU’s Cara Caddoo to learn more about footage identified from a film long believed lost to time and neglect, The Trooper of Troop K, produced by the Black-operated Lincoln Motion Picture Company in 1916. At the time, Trooper became a symbol of the vital importance of Black Americans to the nation’s war efforts. In her book Envisioning Freedom: Cinema and the Building of Modern Black Life, Caddoo asserts such films are not only evidence of African Americans’ contributions to the making of American cinema, but also of the vital importance of the significance of moving pictures to the forging of Black post-emancipation culture and freedom of enjoyment (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2014). 

 
*Please note: this course is a virtual learning opportunity held via the online platform, Zoom. The link needed to participate will be supplied via email prior to the first class session.
 

About the Instructor:

Cara Caddoo is an associate professor of history and of cinema and media studies at IU Bloomington. She is the author of the prize-winning book Envisioning Freedom: Cinema and the Building of Modern Black Life (Harvard University Press, 2014). 

 

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